Going Beyond Fear – Your Key to Growth and Success

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Fear can be useful, but you won’t grow if you allow it to hold you back. As in all things, you need to find the right balance, and our 3-step process will help you work through you fear so that you can boldly push past your comfort zone into the areas where growth is possible.

Is the Fear Specific or General?

Are you worried about a specific aspect of a new opportunity, or is it just a general anxiety of the unknown? Separate the general uneasiness from the specific concerns that you may have about risks you may be taking. For example, being worried about fitting in and thriving at a new company can be chalked up to the general anxiety everyone experiences when starting at a new job. This kind of stress can be expected, and thus not looked at as something that should stop you from going for it.

Are There Steps You Can Take Right Now To Help Reduce Your Worry?

Some of the fear you have regarding a new opportunity that has presented itself can be alleviated immediately. For example, if you are worried about a taking on a new job because it is related to a field that you don’t know much about, you can find a lot of information online that will give you in-depth information on what you can expect. A lot of fear comes from the unknown, so simply learning about what you need to know right now can alleviate a lot of fear.

Are the Risks Worth the Reward?

Once you’ve eliminated general anxiety and taken steps to reduce specific worries, you’re left with a few risks that you need to actively manage. For instance, you may be worried about leaving a relatively secure position for a less secure position. First test each assumption. Is the current position really secure? There are no guarantees in life and people often find themselves let go from jobs they thought were stable. Is the potential employer really insecure? If it’s a start-up, how long can they stay in business based on the current direction of the company. If you were let go how long do you think it would take you to find a new job?  Once you have a handle on the situation, look at why you’re interested in the opportunity. Will there be new duties or skills that will allow you to grow in your career? Will there be a larger salary that will allow you to save against a possible loss of work. Consider each of the rewards against each of the risks and make an informed choice.

Urgent: The 3 Keys To Turning Any Resolution Into An Achievable Goal

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Do you have a list of resolutions you are looking forward to tackling this year? Before you start on your journey to better yourself, it’s important to recognize that most resolutions fall by the way side, not because the person isn’t driven, but because the idea isn’t transferred into an achievable plan for reaching their goals. For those looking forward to a successful year, here are three things you can do to make your resolutions a reality:

Forget the Abstract Idea: Identify the Goals You Are Looking to Achieve

You can’t start working towards a resolution until you identify what exactly you are looking to achieve. Say that your goal is to learn more job-related skills to advance your career. Start by identifying what exactly you want to learn, and picture what a successful completion of your goals would look like. For example, if your resolution is to gain management experience, identify specific steps you can take such as: speaking with your boss about your goals and having yourself put in charge of the “XYZ” project so that you can manage the team to a successful project outcome. Aren’t sure what an achievable goal for your resolution would be? Speak with your mentor, peers or supervisor to get their ideas.

Have an End Date in Mind: Give Yourself a Realistic Date to Get Things Done

There is nothing more daunting then an open ended goal.. When turning your resolution into an actionable plan, set a date by which you intend to reach your goals. While you may end up moving the goal back (or forward) as you progress, having an end date will make your goal concrete and actionable.

Celebrate the Journey: Set Goals Along the Way that Will Keep You Pumped Up

If your goal is to run a marathon or lose 20 pounds, where do you even start? The secret is to break that big goal down into small easily achievable steps. Set a goal to find a marathon training program that will guide you to your goal, or set a goal to meet with a doctor to discuss an exercise and nutritional plan to lose weight. As you achieve each simple goal take a moment to celebrate your achievement and then immediately set the next goal for yourself. Give yourself points along the journey to stop and look back at how far you’ve come and you’ll find yourself much more motivated to continue towards your ultimate success.

 

Which of Your College Friends will Most Influence Your Career?

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Networking doesn’t just occur at campus events and with online connections, in many instances successful networking simply means living your life and trying to stay on good terms with the people you meet along the way. You may not be thinking about your career when you meet the person who will help define your path, but these stories show why it’s important to always try to leave a good impression on everyone you meet.

Sheryl Sandberg- COO of Facebook

What Her Story Teaches You: Get To Know Your Professors

If you are skipping out on open office hours with your professors, you are missing out on an opportunity to network with a professional who often has great connections. Facebook COO, Shery Sandberg learned this while studying economics at Harvard. While finishing up her B.A., she met then-professor Larry Summers, who became her mentor and thesis advisor. Summers eventually recruited Sandberg to be his research assistant for a health study he was doing for the World Bank. Once Ms. Sandberg graduated and started working in the private sector, she was again recruted by Summers, who was now the United States Secretary of the Treasury. While her drive and exceptional intelligence led her to success in Silicon Valley, you can say that getting to know her professor allowed her to get her foot in the door and create a resume that was hard to resist.

Larry Page and Sergey Brin- Co-Founders of Google, Inc.

What Their Story Teaches You: You May Not Be Friends at First, but Getting to Know Someone Can Lead to Amazing Partnerships

There are some people who meet the first day of orientation and become inseparable friends. Sergey Brin and Larry Page, co-founders of Google, Inc., would not fall into that category. When the two initially met at freshman orientation at Stanford, they briefly chatted but seemed to disagree on most subjects. As the semester progressed, they got to know each other a bit more and found they didn’t just liked hanging out together, but were both interested in improving research on the Internet. Page was working on a project focusing on backlinks, and Brin’s interest in data mining systems fit perfectly into areas where Page was struggling. The two teamed up and authored a paper, which would eventually lead to the creation of the world’s biggest and most successful search engine.

Neil Blumenthal, Andrew Hunt, David Gilboa, and Jeffrey Raider- Co-Founders of Warby Parker

What Their Story Teaches You: It’s Amazing where Simple Conversations Between Friends Can Lead

Sometimes the best ideas spring from a couple of friends complaining about a mutual hassle. Neil Blumenthal, Andrew Hunt, David Gilboa, and Jeffrey Raider were graduate students and friends at Wharton University in Philadelphia where they shared a mutual dislike for the cost of glasses. The loss of a $700 pair of glasses led to the idea for Warby Parker, which focuses on high-quality prescription glasses that cost less than people were used to. While starting a successful business may have been the last thing on their minds when the four met, you can never know where a new friendship can go.

As a student, your day is filled with opportunities to get to know people. If there was a common thread between these three stories it’s that relationships were built before opportunities were presented. Whether it’s your professor, someone you sit next to, or that person you also say hi to when you pass them in the hallway, you never know what taking a moment to properly introduce yourself will lead you.

 

 

Let’s Take a Moment to Celebrate You

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December is a month of celebration, but it’s also a month for reflection. Take a moment to think back on your professional accomplishments over the year. We know, the year went by in a blur and it may feel like you didn’t accomplish anything, but dig deeper. Whether you exceeded your quota, delivered a key project or, for those between jobs, connected with a number of possible employers, you do have accomplishments and there are a number of great reasons to remind yourself of that.

It Keeps You Motivated

You’ve accomplished a lot this year, and taking stock of your specific achievements will help you stay hungry and motivated for the next 12 months. You may have been given challenging projects that took you out of your comfort zone, and while there were some bumps along the way, you need to celebrate the fact that you persevered and came out a stronger professional. By identifying what you’ve accomplished, you can look at the next set of challenges with the knowledge that you’ll conquer them and come out more focused and experienced in the end!

Zero-In On Your Strengths for Interviews or Annual Reviews

Whether your January will include job interviews or annual reviews, reflecting on your recent accomplishments will help you excel in these interactions. Managers want to hear specific instances of when you excelled, so being able to answer a question with a specific example carries a lot of weight. Your accomplishments will help you make a case for hiring or promotion.

It Reminds You that You Are Continuously Improving

Nobody is ever going to have a “perfect” year; but you can strive to always grow and improve. Progress can be hard to gauge while it is happening, and you may not realize just how far you’ve come until you take a moment to look back at where you started. When you feel stagnant, it’s important to focus on where you have improved. It’s amazing what a change in focus will do to your psyche moving into the next year.

Going For Gold: How Thinking Like A Superstar Athlete Will Get You The Job

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A world-class athlete will tell you that, when they think of big moments, they visualize winning. Whether it’s inching out the competition for a Gold Medal, or sinking the game-winning shot with one second left on the clock, successful athletes don’t have times for “what ifs” in their outcomes. When it comes to a job search, having the same positive outlook will help you towards success. Don’t worry about “if” you’ll get a job, visualize yourself getting it. This way, you won’t need to worry about the outcome, but rather how you are going to get there. Here are three things to remember when it comes to conducting a job search without worrying about the outcome (because you know you’ll succeed):

Work Backwards: Know Your Goal and Identify Steps That Will Take You There                              

A successful sprinter doesn’t worry about the outcome of a race; they instead focus on the steps that they will take to the top step of the podium. When you are applying for a job, don’t worry about the outcome. Instead identify what you have to do to get there. Working backwards from your goal allows you to work out the steps logically. Start from the last part of the process, accepting a job offer, and look at what goals you have to hit to get there. For example, a job offer comes from a great interview, which you will get by submitting a resume that matches the position, which will be seen if you can work your network to get it to the right people. By the time you lead all the way back to the beginning of your search, you’ll know how to move forwards towards a successful outcome.

Turn a Perceived Weakness Into a Strength

When Kobe Bryant missed a game-winning shot, he would stay long after the rest of the team left the arena to work on that shot.  After losing a race in 2012 by less than .1 second, Michael Phelps changed his training to include high-altitude workouts to help his closing speed.  All athletes have weaknesses, but world-class athletes work to turn their weaknesses into strengths. There are going to be parts of your resume that you may perceive as a weakness. Instead of just hoping you get a job despite them, do something about it. If you don’t have certain skills you see in ads, take an online class to learn them. If you don’t have a lot of experience, take temp jobs to learn on the job. If you feel like something is holding you back, don’t shy away from it, do something about it.

As Long as You Keep It Up, You’ll Succeed

Dan Jansen was considered one of the best speed skaters in the world and was a lock at the 1988 winter games for a medal. He fell in both events. In 1992 he was a gold medal favorite again in his two events. He again failed. In 1994, he finally won gold in his last-ever event. It may have taken him longer than he would have liked, but he achieved his goal. Job searches don’t always go as planned. They have setbacks. They have rough patches. But if you stay positive and keep moving forward, you’ll get there. If you fall down, you’ll come back the next time. If you didn’t get a job, you’ll get the next one. The outcome should never change in your mind, even if you have to adjust the path a little bit.

 

President Appoints Janice Bryant Howroyd, ACT-1 Group CEO, to Key Administration Post

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TORRANCE, CA – May 9, 2016 – The White House announced President Barack Obama has appointed ACT-1 Group Founder and CEO Janice Bryant Howroyd to serve on the Board of Advisors for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. “As a product of an HBCU, I know the value to our society and economy from these institutions,” says Bryant Howroyd.  “The need and privilege of working to support the collective and expanded missions of these schools are tremendous. It is an honor to bring my professional and personal expertise to this appointment.”

The Board advises the President and the Secretary of Education on methods, programs, and strategies to strengthen these valued institutions, including making recommendations in reports to the President on how to increase the private sector role in strengthening HBCUs, with particular emphasis on planning, development, and the use of new technologies to ensure the long-term viability and enhancement of these institutions. “These dedicated individuals bring a wealth of experience and talent to their new roles and I am proud to have them serve in this Administration. I look forward to working with them in the months and years to come,” Obama said in a statement on Thursday.

About Janice Bryant Howroyd: Bryant Howroyd is the CEO of the ACT-1 Group. Founded by Bryant Howroyd in 1978, the ACT-1 Group is the largest privately-held, woman, and minority owned workforce management company in the U.S., and currently operates in 19 countries worldwide. The company provides flexible, comprehensive solutions under three distinct business verticals: Staffing via AppleOne, Workforce Solutions through Agile•1, and Business Services including background checks and screening through A-Check Global. Beyond her success in business, Bryant Howroyd carries a dedicated enthusiasm and passion for civic affairs and community development. She is an Ambassador of the Department of Energy’s Minorities in Energy Initiativ, a Board Member of the Department of Labor’s Workforce Initiative Board, and a Member of the Industry Trade Advisory Committee on Services and Finance Industries of the U.S. Trade Representative and the Department of Commerce. She has also served on the Women’s Leadership Board at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and the Board of Directors for North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University.

 

 

 Janice Bryant Howroyd, ACT•1 Group Founder and CEO, Receives Key Appointment to White House from President Obama

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Congratulations to our Founder and CEO, Janice Bryant Howroyd! Janice’s key appointment by President Obama to serve on the Board of Advisors for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities is a huge honor and pathway to directly advise the President and the Secretary of Education on methods, programs and strategies to strengthen Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Read more about this key appointment here: http://bit.ly/1T7IGay.